Driving To Deliver Your Business

alternative-fuels

Successful start to Quiet Cities 2014

Over 200 delegates at the first day of Quiet Cities 2014 were told that the nature of urban freight must change in order to meet the multiple challenges of the 21st century. In the first day of the two day global summit, delegates heard speeches from Lord Digby Jones 1 and Sir Peter Hendy 2 , while Stacey Hodge, director of the Office of Freight Mobility at the New York City Department of Transportation 3 (NYCDoT) joined via videolink. All were united in outlining the booming population of global urban centres, the demand from those people as consumers for immediate satisfaction, and the need for business and government to deliver solutions to these problems.

Ian Wainwright (pictured above), head of freight and fleet programmes at TfL which proved that out-of-hours could work during the Olympics in 2012 said: London is changing, and so is the way we deliver freight. There is rising demand from more customers, and the population of London will rise by 1.7 million by 2031. Doing nothing is not an option.

We have to do something different. However he did explain that 47% of HGVs in peak congestion hours were involved in construction, and it would be a major challenge to alter that supply chain. Jason Andrews, of Croydon Borough Council in Greater London, said that its population had doubled in 20 years, and that the town centre would see a large amount of construction activity in the city centre, with a new Westfield shopping centre set to be built over the next five years.

Congestion risk is one of our biggest priorities, he said of planning the challenge of such large scale construction activity. The Borough is expecting 14,000 HGV vehicle movements a month over the next four years. Richard Fleming, logistics director at Sainsbury s 4 , said that the retailer now had more convenience stores (676) than supermarkets (595) and that was providing a specific urban logistics challenge, particularly as 50% of its convenience stores were subject to planning regulations.

The consumer wants to shop more, and shop more frequently. That means we need to go into city centres more often with smaller loads, he said, adding that its logistics operation which comprises of more than 2,000 vehicles, needed to minimise mileage in distributing to this channel of retail. We take the Silent Night approach.

We need to respect communities, he said. Hodge (pictured above) , of the NYC DoT, concurred: We see opportunities for residents and benefits for industry. Out-of-hour delivery trials have taken place in the city since 2007, with the 2008 recession slowing progress.

The first tranche of trials involved retailers Foot Locker and Whole Foods, alongside food distributor Sysco with drivers reporting that they felt more safe delivering at night in lower levels of traffic, and businesses reporting that vehicles spent less time being stationary, meaning more deliveries could be made by the same driver. Now the NYC trial involves over 400 companies, including 72 of 121 Dunkin Donuts stores in Manhattan. The global summit continues today.

References ^ Lord Digby Jones (www.digbylordjones.com) ^ Sir Peter Hendy (www.tfl.gov.uk) ^ New York City Department of Transportation (www.nyc.gov) ^ Sainsbury s (www.sainsburys.co.uk)

Read the article:
Successful start to Quiet Cities 2014

More Cheap Accessories